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Joe

Minga (if really so spelled) is a derivation from "Minchia" (vulgar Italian term for penis), a word used in many ways, not only as an exclamation. A quite common sentence could be "Non capisce una minchia!", which in English one could freely translate as "He does not understand a fuck".

Check this too:

http://www.demauroparavia.it/70073

If you have some knowledge of Italian, and speak it now and then, please note that the usage of the word "minchia" might be perceived as very vulgar in some environments.

Tony

Minga is slang for slut or hooker, everyone knows that. Nice answer Joe but wrong.

Rhianna

my grandmother says this, and while she never explained the definition, i always took it to mean an equivalent of "Geez!" She always said it right after,"Whatsa matta with you, eh!? Minga!"

ahaaahah true story.

Giavanni

In my family, the term Minga was used in a variety of ways. I would get a slap from my parents if I used it when I was a child, but it was welcomed in conversation when I grew older. Some of the contexts I heard it in are below (my spelling is probably less than accurate)

"He's a minga muerta" - translation - he is a dead dick

"Minga, Johnny, you gotta lotta balls" - used as an expression of surprise

"Ma que minga que frido va?" - ask an old-school to tell you the story behind that.

Hope that helps.

Wally

I have always understood "Minga" to mean "penis".

And "Misca" (mee-ska) was a Sicilian verson.

Roger Bencivenga

All of this is bunch of malarkey. One must keep in mind that Italian immigrants who arrived in the US at the turn of the 20th century came here using a dialectical Italian that was frozen in time. The language evolved in Italy into standard Italian and school kids there today know little of the various dialects. Prounciation of final vowels in words like prosciutto, linguine, etc., was largely ignored in many Italian dialects, especially those from southern Italy, so saying "lingween" and "proshoot" was essentially correct. But not today. (It's horrible to hear a waiter/waitress speak this way and I ALWAYS correct them.) Given this, how does anyone explain why some people think espresso is pronounced EXpresso? Is that the same laziness as in EKcetera

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